You are here
Home > 2017 > January

Blood-repellent materials: A new approach to medical implants

Medical implants like stents, catheters and tubing introduce risk for blood clotting and infection — a perpetual problem for many patients. Colorado State University engineers offer a potential solution: A specially grown, “superhemophobic” titanium surface that’s extremely repellent to blood. The material could form the basis for surgical implants with lower risk of rejection by…

Ants find their way even when going backwards

An international team including researchers at the university of Edinburgh and Antoine Wystrach of the Research Centre on Animal Cognition (CNRS/UniversitĂ© Toulouse III — Paul Sabatier) has shown that ants can get their bearings whatever the orientation of their body. Their brains may be smaller than the head of a pin, but ants are excellent…

Graphene’s sleeping superconductivity awakens

Further enhances the potential of graphene, which is already widely seen as a material that could revolutionise industries such as healthcare and electronics. Graphene is a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms and combines several remarkable properties; for example, it is very strong, but also light and flexible, and highly conductive. Since its discovery in 2004,…

Heat from Earth’s core could be underlying force in plate tectonics

For decades, scientists have theorized that the movement of Earth’s tectonic plates is driven largely by negative buoyancy created as they cool. New research, however, shows plate dynamics are driven significantly by the additional force of heat drawn from the Earth’s core.he findings show the East Pacific Rise, the Earth’s dominant mid-ocean ridge, is dynamic…

South American fossil tomatillos show nightshades evolved earlier than thought

Delicate fossil remains of tomatillos found in Patagonia, Argentina, show that this branch of the economically important family that also includes potatoes, peppers, tobacco, petunias and tomatoes existed 52 million years ago, long before the dates previously ascribed to these species, according to an international team of scientists. Tomatillos, ground cherries and husk tomatoes —…

Zooplankton rapidly evolve tolerance to road salt

A common species of zooplankton  the smallest animals in the freshwater food web  can evolve genetic tolerance to moderate levels of road salt in as little as two and a half months. The study is the first to demonstrate that the animals can rapidly evolve higher tolerance to road salt, and indicates that freshwater ecosystems…

DNA nanotubes build a bridge between two molecular posts

In a microscopic feat that resembled a high-wire circus act, Johns Hopkins researchers have coaxed DNA nanotubes to assemble themselves into bridge-like structures arched between two molecular landmarks on the surface of a lab dish. This self-assembling bridge process, which may someday be used to connect electronic medical devices to living cells. To describe this…

The beating heart of solar energy

The notion of using solar cells placed under the skin to continuously recharge implanted electronic medical devices is a viable one. Swiss researchers have done the math, and found that a 3.6 square centimeter solar cell is all that is needed to generate enough power during winter and summer to power a typical pacemaker. The…

Zinc eaten at levels found in biofortified crops reduces ‘wear and tear’ on DNA

A new study by researchers from the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Research Institute (CHORI) shows that a modest 4 milligrams of extra zinc a day in the diet can have a profound, positive impact on cellular health that helps fight infections and diseases. This amount of zinc is equivalent to what biofortified crops like zinc…

How to 3-D print your own sonic tractor beam

Last year Asier Marzo, then a doctoral student at the Public University of Navarre, helped develop the first single-sided acoustic tractor beam that is, the first realization of trapping and pulling an object using sound waves from only one direction. Now a research assistant at the University of Bristol, Marzo has lead a team that…

Top