You are here
Home > 2016 > July

Human nose holds novel antibiotic effective against multiresistant pathogens

A potential lifesaver lies unrecognized in the human body: Scientists at the University of Tübingen and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) have discovered that Staphylococcus lugdunensis which colonizes in the human nose produces a previously unknown antibiotic. As tests on mice have shown, the substance which has been named Lugdunin is able to…

Florida investigation links four recent Zika cases to local mosquito-borne virus transmission

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been informed by the State of Florida that Zika virus infections in four people were likely caused by bites of local Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The cases are likely the first known occurrence of local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission in the continental United States. CDC is closely…

A new leaf: Scientists turn carbon dioxide back into fuel

As scientists and policymakers around the world try to combat the increasing rate of climate change, they have focused on the chief culprit: carbon dioxide. Produced by the burning of fossil fuels in power plants and car engines, carbon dioxide continues to accumulate in the atmosphere, warming the planet. But trees and other plants do…

Kashmir, Challenge & Opportunity for Modi Govt

Suddenly a challenge has been deliberately thrown against Modi government in the form of artificial mass rebellion in Kashmir Valley. If PM Narendra Modi is successful in exposing the plotters of ‘rebellion’ backed by Pakistan and able to establish dialogue with genuine leadership of Kashmiri Muslim leaders than he will have unhindered rule for next…

Ultrathin, transparent oxide thin-film transistors developed for wearable display

With the advent of the Internet of Things (IoT) era, strong demand has grown for wearable and transparent displays that can be applied to various fields such as augmented reality (AR) and skin-like thin flexible devices. However, previous flexible transparent displays have posed real challenges to overcome, which are, among others, poor transparency and low…

Abundant and diverse ecosystem found in area targeted for deep-sea mining

Scientists discovered impressive abundance and diversity among the creatures living on the seafloor in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ) — an area in the equatorial Pacific Ocean being targeted for deep-sea mining. The study, lead authored by Diva Amon, a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and…

Swirling data: Boosting computing power and info transfer rates tenfold

Like a whirlpool, a new light-based communication tool carries data in a swift, circular motion. the optics advancement could become a central component of next generation computers designed to handle society’s growing demand for information sharing. It may also be a salve to those fretting over the predicted end of Moore’s Law, the idea that…

No dream: Electric brain stimulation during sleep can boost memory

When you sleep, your brain is busy storing and consolidating things you learned that day, stuff you’ll need in your memory toolkit tomorrow, next week, or next year. For many people, especially those with neurological conditions, memory impairment can be a debilitating symptom that affects every-day life in profound ways. For the first time, UNC…

Ancient feces provides earliest evidence of infectious disease being carried on Silk Road

An ancient latrine near a desert in north-western China has revealed the first archaeological evidence that travellers along the Silk Road were responsible for the spread of infectious diseases along huge distances of the route 2,000 years ago. Cambridge researchers Hui-Yuan Yeh and Piers Mitchell used microscopy to study preserved faeces on ancient ‘personal hygiene…

Top