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Crows are as clever as your seven-year-old

Aesop’s fable that told us how smart the thirsty crow was. Scientists have now discovered that crows are as intelligent as a seven-year-old child, says. Their abilities to make tools, such as prodding sticks and hooks which they use to pick up out grubs from logs and branches, have been counted for their smartness. Scientists…

New airborne GPS technology to predict hurricanes

Anew GPS system aboard airplanes can improve hurricane forecasting and weather models by detecting precise conditions in the atmosphere, scientists say. Current measurement systems that use Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite signals as a source to probe the atmosphere rely on GPS receivers that are fixed to ground and cannot measure over the ocean, or…

Artificial hearts can be a temporary fix

  An artificial heart may help patients survive while awaiting a heart transplant, although the devices remain risky 10 years after they were approved, according to a US study . Researchers followed 22 patients with end-stage heart failure over the course of two months, to see how they responded to implantation with a Syncardia total…

Soon, just walk to charge your mobile

Researchers are now looking at ways to harness everyday motion to power mobile devices commercially. Zhong Lin Wang, Ph.D., and his team, including graduate student Long Lin who presented their work at the 247th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), have set out to transform the way we look at mechanical…

People do' see red when they are angry

Angry people really do “see red” where others don’t, scientists have shown. And a preference for red over blue may even be an indicator of a more hostile personality. In a study examining humankind’s ancient association of the colour red with anger, aggression and danger, researchers found that when shown images that were neither fully…

Low back pain biggest source of global disability

Low back pain causes more disability around the globe than any other condition, and accounts for a third of all work related disability, according to new research. Almost one in 10 people (9.4 per cent) worldwide suffer from low back pain, researchers found. The prevalence of low back pain was highest in Western Europe, followed…

NASA searches for ideas to bring asteroids closer to earth

A n image provided by NASA/JPL-Caltech shows a simulation of asteroid 2012 DA14 approaching from the south as it passes through the Earth-moon system on. U.S. space agency NASA has announced a formal proposal worth $6 million for projects that would help robots and astronauts grab an asteroid from deep space and bring it closer…

Engineers design 'living materials': Hybrid materials combine bac- terial cells with nonliving elements that emit light

Inspired by natural materials such as bone — a matrix of minerals and other substances, including living cells – engineers have coaxed bacterial cells to produce biofilms that can incorporate nonliving materials, such as gold nanoparticles and quantum dots. These “living materials” combine the advantages of live cells, which respond to their environment, produce complex…

Tattooing to deliver medicine

A group from France has published a paper last week in the journal Scientific Reports in which they have successfully used tattooing as the means to deliver a drug beneath the skin of a rat. The animal was infected by the microbe leishamania, which attacks cells underneath the skin. Conventional methods such as applying ointments…

'Bestie', 'wackadoodle' latest addition to Oxford Dictionary

The Oxford English Dictionary has included more than 900 new words, phrases, and senses in its latest edition, including ‘beatboxer’,’bestie’ and ‘wackadoodle’. Words such ‘scissor-kick’, ‘crap shoot’, ‘DIYer’, ‘Old Etonian’ and ‘bookaholic’ are some other notable additions to the dictionary’s edition for March 2014. “Over 900 new words, phrases, and senses enter the Oxford English…

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